Scala is both object-oriented and functional (Took me a while to understand it)

Personally, I started programming in Scala in 2015… I did the Scala training on Coursera.

Guess what? at First I did not like Scala! I could not understand why I would want to implement all these complexity when I can use Java and Spring to solve all the problems… It turned out i was wrong.

To write functional Scala, you need to think functionally…  rather than thinking in Object Oriented Manner & translating those thoughts into Functional Paradigm.

My real Scala interest started not with Web Api’s, it started when i laid an interest on Spark. I wanted to build a clean, abstracted approach to Big Data & implement it with the best functional language! that’s when I started loving Scala.

Immutable Data easily leads to pure function and easily distributable code.

I came to the conclusion, when i want to write something in Scala… to do it with Pure Functions if i choose to use the functional paradigm. This allowed me to do some of the following:

  1. Pure functions have no side-effects
  2. Pure function calls to immutable data are often easy to reorder
  3. Pure function calls to immutable collections are often easy to parallelise

Use Expressions instead of statements.. Expressions Can be passed into a function. As expressions can be chained together in Scala.

Don’t Mix Java Statements with Scala expressions.

Unlike statements, expressions can be used to be specify arguments to a function. As Functions, a subtle point – Scala allows expressions to be used in place of functions.

It took me some time to get used to the idea.

Xamarin becomes the native cross-platform solution for C# and Java developers

Xamarin has announced its acquisition of RoboVM, a momentous step for both companies which means C# and Java developers need only look to a single development solution for native deployment across each of the major platforms.

The software has been a beloved tool for C# developers for some time as the only solution which enables native iOS and Android development. RoboVM offered the same ability to deploy Android and iOS applications natively, but for Java developers. Bringing the C# and Java languages together – the most used languages in enterprise development – provides a path to mobile for most developers.

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Building flexible and high performance software with CQRS and Axon Framework

Many applications are built with the same architectural style: a layered architecture with (more often than not) an anaemic domain model. While easy to set up, this architectural style doesn’t help us deal with growing complexity or heavy non-functional requirements.

In this presentation, Allard will introduce CQRS (Command-Query Responsibility Segregation) and Axon Framework. CQRS is an architectural pattern that helps build scalable and maintainable software, by applying a few very simple, yet powerful, principles. Axon is a framework that simplifies the implementation of CQRS based architectures on the JVM.

Building flexible and high performance software with CQRS and Axon Framework – Allard Buijze from JavaZone on Vimeo.

 

Why JHipster? AngularJS Spring-Boot Liquibase MongoDB ElasticSearch

In the last few years the face of web development has undergone some significant changes. New technologies have appeared that have added some radically different choices for building web applications. The three major pieces involved in a web app, the client, the server, and the database, have each seen widespread changes in what is available.

When web applications first became popular, clients were simply a combination of HTML and CSS. Use of JavaScript was negligible. Over the past 15 years that trend has slowly and consistently changed such that more and more client-side code is included in web applications.

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